Category Archives: Astrophotography

Total Moon Eclipse

We were able to watch this very rare astronomical phenomenon from the beautiful place in Poland – among the rocks of the Kraków-Częstochowa Upland, next to the medieval walls of the Castle in Olsztyn. Not only the place was a lucky one, but also the weather made it possible at all! Early morning there was a light frost  and the sky was perfectly clear. Above the castle there already towered the winter constellations. We appreciate very much that the officials of Olsztyn decided not to light up the castle, thanks to what the observations were efficient and atmosferic. There were more stargazers along with us. Sometimes they walked over the rocks and walls of the dark fourtress, flashing their flashlights on the background of starry sky with bloodmoon hanged in a void of space… Everything was just beautiful and led us to deep reflections.

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Partial Moon eclipse

There is well seen the Earth’s shadow successively unveiling the glowing part of the full moon.

Ⓒ Bogumił Hoder
Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Photo data:

– location: North hemisphere, Central Europe;
– latitude: N 51° 56′ 24.00″;
– longitude: E 15° 29′ 24.00″;
– direction: North-East;
– time: 10.12.2011, 17:45 a.m.;
– camera: KONICA MINOLTA DiMAGE Z5, f/4,5, shutter speed 4’’, ISO-50, 420 mm + frame.

Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Starscape

On the picture there is seen a part of the Milky Way with the constellation of Perseus in the middle of the frame. A bright object on the right is the rising planet Jupiter. To the left from him, above the tower seen on the horizon there is seen the opened star cluster M45 Pleiades. On the upper right part of the picture there can be seen also the M31 galaxy, known as the Great Andromeda Nebula. The horizon is lighted up by situated in the distance of 15 kilometers Zielona Góra. On the bright glow the camera recorded the traces of moving satellites and planes.

Ⓒ Bogumił Hoder
Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Photo data:

– location: North hemisphere, Central Europe;
– latitude: N 51° 56′ 24.00″;
– longitude: E 15° 29′ 24.00″;
– direction: South-East;
– time: 24.09.2011, 9:00 a.m.;
– camera: Nikon D700, f/2,8, shutter speed 30 s, ISO-1600, 14 mm.

Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

End of summer

Directly above the forest there is seen the setting central part of our Galaxy focused in the constellation of Sagittarius. Unfortunately this glow of city light, and relatively low position of the center of Milky Way make impossible admiring great number of the nebulae, star clusters, and interstellar dust and gases. Almost in the middle of the frame there is seen the star Altair from the Eagle constellation, higher on the right shines Vega – alpha star of the Swan constellation, which reigns above.

Ⓒ Bogumił Hoder
Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Photo data:

– location: North hemisphere, Central Europe;
– latitude: N 51° 56′ 24.00″;
– longitude: E 15° 29′ 24.00″;
– direction: South-West;
– time: 24.09.2011, 9:00 a.m.;
– camera: Nikon D700, f/2,8, shutter speed 30 s, ISO-2000, 14 mm.

Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Fullmoon – “Blue Moon”

Full Moon photographed in the time of the greatest close-up of our natural satellite to Earth – called “Blue Moon”. The Moon closed-up to distance about 360 000 km., it was brighter and had a bigger angle dimensions. The picture is a mosaic, done with the method of the eyepiece projection, and folded-up in the graphic program.

Ⓒ Bogumił Hoder
Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Photo data:

– location: North hemisphere, Central Europe;
– latitude: N 51° 56′ 24.00″;
– longitude: E 15° 29′ 24.00″;
– direction: South-East;
– time: 19.03.2011, 11:00 a.m.;
– camera: KONICA MINOLTA DiMAGE Z5, Sky Watcher Synta 12’’ Newtonian telescope, Swan 33 mm eyepiece + frame.

Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Winter southern sky

Winter Southern sky with the bright constellations – Orion, Taurus, Gemini, and rising Canis Major. On the left side there is well seen the brightest star of the sky, Sirius, nearby on the right distinguishes clearly the famous Orion belt created by three stars – Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka. There are also seen two red giants – Betelgeuse to the left, and – to the right – Aldebaran, wandering on the background of the Hyades – opened star cluster. On the upper left side of the photo, there are two bright stars of the Gemini – Pollux, and Castor.

Ⓒ Bogumił Hoder
Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Photo data:

– location: North hemisphere, Central Europe;
– latitude: N 51° 56′ 24.00″;
– longitude: E 15° 29′ 24.00″;
– direction: South-West;
– time: 07.02.2011, 9:00 a.m.;
– camera: Nikon D700, f/5,6, shutter speed 30 s, ISO-6400, 14 mm.

Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Dawn of the autumn constellations

Dawn of the autumn constellations with the Perseus, Aries, and Taurus. The bright group of stars on the downright sight is the opened star cluster M45 Pleiades. The group on the upper left side of the picture is the Double Cluster in Perseus NGC 869, and NGC 884, or the h+χ Persei.

Ⓒ Bogumił Hoder
Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder

Photo data:

– location: North hemisphere, Central Europe;
– latitude: N 51° 56′ 24.00″;
– longitude: E 15° 29′ 24.00″;
– direction: East;
– time: 11.09.2010, 11:30 a.m.;
– camera: Nikon D700, f/2,8, shutter speed 30 s, ISO-1600, 24 mm.

Ⓒ Bogumil Hoder